A Better Today

Depressant
Substance Abuse

When Depressant Abuse Develops into an Addiction

Depressants, also known as “downers,” are one of the most commonly abused categories of drugs. Depressants drugs lower neurotransmission levels and lower stimulation in various areas of the brain. The most widely used depressants today are alcohol, opioids, and Benzodiazepines. Alcohol itself is a strong depressant and one that has been used by humans for centuries.

Many individuals who abuse depressant drugs are looking for the calming effects that the drugs have. Over time, they will chase the effects of depressants at any costs. Physical and psychological dependency can occur rapidly, and an individual can find themselves having serious withdrawal symptoms if they are unable to procure their depressant of choice. Individuals who abuse depressants can also find themselves having uncontrollable mood swings or becoming uncharacteristically aggressive towards others.

For many, there have been drug-induced anxiety, psychosis, and mood disorders. When a depressant drug has taken over an individual’s life, it may take time for that individual to seek out help to end the cycle of depressant abuse. Any individual who finds themselves abusing depressants such as alcohol, opioids, benzos, and barbiturates, should start in a detox facility where they are safely medically supervised. After detox, Individualized substance abuse treatment can drastically improve lives. All it takes a bit of determination, the ability to work for things to get better, and the strength and resolve to get started on the road to recovery.

Nearly 40% of crimes happen under the influence of alcohol.

Sign, Symptoms & Common Behaviors of Depressant Abuse

The signs and symptoms that an individual can show when they are abusing depressant drugs can be quite evident and easy to point out. Most depressant drugs will make an individual seem sleepy or “out-of-it”, depending on what type depressant and how much they are using. Those who frequently abuse depressants will always seem drowsy and may have coordination problems and memory loss.

Some depressants, such as opioids, can cause pin-point dilation, while others, like alcohol, can cause pupils to dilate. An individual may have slurred speech and difficulty holding a conversation. Depressant addiction can quickly take a toll on an individual’s life and they may pursue the depressant drugs to no end, regardless of consequences.

For individuals who are persistent in their abuse of depressant drugs: overdose or other potentially fatal consequences are certainly a reality. And depending on which drug is used— withdrawal symptoms are inevitable when the individual reaches a point where they are unable to procure more of their preferred depressant.

Commonly Abused Depressant Drugs

Alcohol

Alcohol is the most widely known and used depressant, often being the first type of depressant that anyone uses due to its widespread social acceptance and availability. For some, alcohol does lead to experimentation with other drugs due to negatively affected judgment during intoxication; daily alcohol use leads to physical dependence, with difficult and potentially fatal consequences if the individual decides to stop drinking cold turkey at home without medical supervision.

Benzodiazepines

Benzodiazepine is a term used to describe depressant drugs such as a Xanax (alprazolam), Valium (diazepam), Ativan (lorazepam), and Klonopin (clonazepam). Benzodiazepines are medications that cause mild to severe depression of the central nervous system and sedation. Benzodiazepine medications have a high potential for abuse but are used medically to treat anxiety, insomnia, and other types of disorders. Withdrawal from Benzodiazepines presents potentially fatal challenges as physical dependence sets in after months or years of abuse.

Barbiturates

Barbiturates fall into the category of sedative-hypnotic drugs. Barbiturates act on the central nervous system as a depressant and can produce a range of mild sedation to total anesthesia. Barbiturate drugs in their generic form such as amobarbital, butabarbital, pentobarbital, and phenobarbital are commonly prescribed to help in the aid of anxiety and sleep. The use of Barbiturates has been in decline since the 1970s with the creation of Benzodiazepines.

FAQ

What are Depressants?

Depressants, or Central Depressants, are downers ranging from Alcohol, to Xanax, Marijuana, Valium, Clonazepam and many more. Opiates like Heroin have very similar “downer” affects as Depressants however they are not technically Depressants.

What are common street names for Depressants?

Benzos, Tranks, Downers, Blue Vs, Bars, Z-Bars, Handlebars, Footballs, K-Pins, Pins, and more

What do withdrawals from depressants look like?

Some withdrawal effects of Depressants are shaking, dizziness, vomiting, diarrhea, headaches, nausea, anxiety and hallucinations. Withdrawal symptoms may be different depending on what Depressants were used, how long they were abused and how often.

Find A Better Way With
A Better Today Recovery Services
888-906-0952

  • Confidential
  • 24/7
  • Financing Available
  • Most Insurance Accepted

ABTRS makes the recovery decision easy

Risk-Free

Struggling with addiction is difficult, so why should your rehab be? ABTRS takes the risk out of the equation.

Confidential

From the first phone consultation, to your rehabilitation and sobriety, ABTRS makes your privacy our number one concern.

ABTRS Guarantee

No one ever said that the journey into recovery would easy, but we have a promise. Complete our 90-day program and receive a 28-day tune-up.

Get Help Now (888)-906-0952

phone icon

Stop Addiction Call:
1-888-906-0952